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Summer jobs for teens wane even as research finds big benefits 

Summer jobs are still a gateway to vital work habits and opportunities, research shows, but they're much rarer than they used to be. That's especially true for disadvantaged youths who could benefit the most. 

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Netflix subscribers continue to grow, so why is the company borrowing to pay its bills? 

Netflix logged 5.2 million new subscribers just in the second quarter but projections say it will be a few more years before programming expenses are out of the red.

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Will Trump restrain steel imports? Why many in GOP wouldn’t mind if he did. 

If the US slaps tariffs or quotas on steel imports, the espoused aim would be to strike a blow against unfair trade practices. But it would showcase a rift in a changing Republican Party – and shake the global trade system.

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Unions and lawmakers press Trump to protect workers in NAFTA talks 

With NAFTA negotiations to happen next month, the Trump administration is set to release its priorities within the next 30 days under the 'fast-track' rules.

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Improvements to Honda Accord could boost sales after decline 

Honda says its new Accord brings a new approach to fuel economy, technology, styling, and safety as it charges into a slumping United States sedan market.

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Male nurses? Female firefighters? Yes, as career boundaries erode.  

More women are entering male-dominated career fields, and vice versa, according to new research. That increased fluidity could be a promising step toward equal pay.

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British gig economy workers want job security in changing workplace 

A recent government report concludes the 'dependent contractor' should receive additional protection. Unions are skeptical, saying the report is a feeble response to inequity.

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When auto insurance becomes a social-justice question 

Car insurance costs notably more in predominantly African-American neighborhoods, studies conclude. In Detroit, the mayor and citizens seek a fix for sky-high premiums.

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Google gets hit with huge fine by EU for its dominance in online searches 

The European Commission found evidence that Google's search results give illegal precedence to its own shopping service over rival services, resulting in a record-breaking 2.42 billion-euro fine. Meanwhile, the internet giant is considering an appeal. 

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Eurozone economy celebrates growth, though progress not uniform 

Several countries are celebrating steady growth in the eurozone economy, which just experienced its best quarter in six years. Surveys of France and Germany reflect that progress, while Italy, held back by debt and other weaknesses, faces more uncertainties.

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Venezuela crisis raises question: When is buying bonds unethical? 

Goldman Sachs stirred an uproar with a May bond investment in Venezuela’s state-owned oil company, at a time when citizens there face food shortages and a dictatorial regime.

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Chinese food regulation sparks disapproval from 37 nations 

In a recent proposal of a WTO regulation regarding foreign food, China asked for an additional inspection guarantee on all imported goods. Those opposed to the regulation say it would affect billions of dollars’ worth of products and waste precious resources. 

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As Millennials take leadership roles, it spells change in corporate culture 

As young workers move toward the C-suite, companies are making big changes to retain and nurture them – from moving downtown to better aligning businesses with their values.

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Uber CEO resigns, company hopes to embrace a new chapter of growth 

The world's largest ride-service company attempts to end a string of scandals and avoid further toxic leadership as Uber's CEO Travis Kalanick resigns under investor pressure. 

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With Amazon deal, retailing revolution aims at your dining table 

A year ago, 28 percent of Millennials said they sometimes shop for groceries online. This year it's 43 percent. That doesn't spell the end of physical food stores, but times are changing.

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